Water definitions

Inland waters

Inland waters (freshwater) are:

  • any waterway from its mouth to its source and any inlet or lagoon connected with it; and
  • any swamp, lake, lagoon, backwater, billabong, dam, river, stream or public water storage reservoir.

Inland waters do not include:

  • the Gippsland Lakes, Lower Lake of Mallacoota Inlet (see map 5), Lake Tyers (see map 7) and Wingan Inlet (which are considered marine waters).

Marine waters

Marine waters are:

  • the Gippsland Lakes, Lower Lake of Mallacoota Inlet (see map 5), Lake Tyers (see map 7) and Wingan Inlet; and
  • Victorian waters that are not inland waters such as (but not limited to) Port Phillip Bay, Western Port.

Note: Water on private property, such as farm dams, are neither inland nor marine waters.

Mouth

The mouth is the imaginary line between the seaward banks of a river, lake or estuary, where;

  • those waters meet the sea (for examples see maps 1 and 2).
  • where those waters flow into a bay, inlet or lake that is defined as a marine water (eg. Gippsland Lakes, Wingan Inlet) (see map 3).
a map displaying an inland and marine water boundary 

Map 1: Example of an inland and marine water boundary

 

Map 2: Example of an inland and marine water boundary

 


Map 3: Example of an inland and marine water boundary

 

The location of the inland/marine water boundary (mouth) differs for the following waterways (see maps 4-9).

Map 4: Inland and marine water boundary at Curdies Inlet

 

Map 5: Inland and marine water boundary at Mallacoota Inlet

 

Map 6: Inland and marine water boundary at the Merri River

 

Map 7: Inland and marine water boundaries at Lake Tyers

 

Map 8: Inland and marine water boundary at the Barwon River

 Map 9: Inland and marine water boundary at the Yarra River